Day 12 of the Touch with Good challenge

One of the best parts of working as a designer is I get the privilege to be involved with amazing inspiring people and bring their ideas into vision.

Such an example was my lovely friend Katya Georgieva and her project Touch with Good/ kindness (originally in Bulgarian: Докосни с добро). The project is dedicated to sharing the stories of genuine acts of kindness we have experienced from other people, and thus inspiring for MORE kindness in the world and making it a better place.

She got inspiration from the wisdom:

When you do kindness, keep silent. When you receive kindness — tell everyone.

With the new year 2018, Katya started a viral challenge to share such stories 20 days in a row, and somehow… I got “infected”.

So here is my…

Day 12 of the Touch with Good challenge

As hard as it is for some of my friends to believe, there weren’t Barbie dolls available for sale in Bulgaria before 1989.

I first saw a Barbie not before the first- second grade when I was visiting my dear friend Yana. She had the doll borrowed temporarily for her to play. It was from America. She was different from all dolls I had ever seen up until then. Smaller in size, but with a figure of a grown woman. Her legs could bend; she had make-up and long blond hair. I remember examining her thoroughly and once I even managed undressing her to check out what was hidden beneath.

Soon after that Barbie-like toys gradually became available but they were of apparently inferior quality and they were not “original”. The little girls at school yearned for the mythical original Barbies that only lucky few of us had seen and held in real.

One day — I was in the fourth grade — a rumour spread at school. There was a booth next to the central department store (something like an old-school version of a Mall) where you could find original Barbies! The cheapest one was 225 Bulgarian leva. And such a grizzling began!… I want a Barbie, and I want a Barbie!…

But instead of going the conventional way of bringing out the money (or telling me I couldn’t have it), mom and dad had a different idea.

“How about earning the money by yourself?” — my dad suggested.

“What do you mean?”, I got confused.

“Well, each time you do the dishes, you will get 5 leva and thus you’ll gradually collect 225 to get your Barbie.”

That sounded fair to me. I could somehow manage to collect them until my birthday. I hadn’t calculated how many times I would have to do the dishes but I sometimes overreached in doing them more than once a day so that I could get the promised reward.

And so, little by little, the sum was collected. When I had finally the money in place, I gave it to my mom with delight; and she, equally delighted, promised to provide me with the Barbie for my birthday.

The morning of my birthday I was awakened by a certain rustling next to my head — some package my mom was pushing. I sat in the bed and I saw a huge luxurious bag with a large Barbie picture and sign on it. I opened the bag and inside… there was the most beautiful ballerina I had ever seen! And the label on her box read My First Barbie 🙂

My First Barbie. 1991 edition.

BUT… She was not the one I had collected the money for. I had earlier wheedled going to the above-mentioned booth and see the Barbies. The one for which the big fuss was all about, turned out to be a complete disappointment. She was in a small box and with a simple outfit. Nothing made her stand out.

Mom explained that when she went for the buy, she didn’t like her and she decided to get another one, although it would be more expensive. She had chosen not the most expensive, but the most beautiful one. ❤

I did have quite a few original Barbies after that. But it’s true that even after her hair tousled, and her clothes wore out, the first one remained the most beautiful. ❤

Visit Meg at JustHowCoolIsThat.com